Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Lifecycle of a theologian

Oedipus gave the answer to the Sphinx's question "what goes on four legs in the morning, two in the day, three in the evening" as man. A theologian is like this.
In the beginning they are Armininan, still of self, trusting, full of wonder and delight, without knowledge and understanding. They are like children, nice, and sweet, and still selfish, and still need to mature but still pleasant to be around.
Then, with some growth they become teenagers, err, Calvinists. Full of knowledge, puffed up with it in fact, but still lacking knowledge. There is no longer a wonder as they know all the answers. If you have one word to describe them it's rotten. Teenagers are just rotten. Particularly if they never grow up.
But with a little more maturity comes something much closer to perfection, knowledge with wisdom. It is now that the theologian comes nearly full circle, and sees his dependence, and limit, and regains that childlike awe and wonder of God's doctrines.
Calvinism is a great stepping stone, but a terrible stopping point.

1 comment:

THEOparadox said...

Phil,

Good thoughts here! As that great stepping stone to God-honoring wonder, glorious perplexity, and satisfying joy, Calvinism is unparalleled. It's sad that so many settle for the mere "knowledge" and heady "rightness" of it. We Calvinists give ourselves a bad name through our arrogance in that stage of development. However, this only serves to confirm the Biblical view of human corruption and the progressive nature of sanctification, right?

As the law increases sin, so the truth can increase our pride - until by God's mercy we find the humility of Christ, who IS the Truth.

Blessings and Merry Christmas, friend.

Derek